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Category: Vegan

Hot and Garlicky Fermented Red Cabbage Pickle (shoor-e kalam ghermez)

The garlicky fermented red cabbage pickle recipe I’m sharing with you today makes very crunchy and deliciously tangy pickles. Who doesn’t like a bit of crunch in their salad, wrap or sandwich? I definitely do and always have a few jars of crunchy pickles around but this one is a very recent addition to my pantry.

I always pickle shredded cabbage in vinegar with lots of chillies and garlic. A couple of months ago I decided to experiment with the brining method that I always use for making Iranian fermented mixed vegetable pickles (shoor). The pickle took only minutes to make but I had to wait for almost a month to test the results. The first batch was so delicious and gone so quickly I made a second batch two days ago, this time several jars.

pickled-cabbage-recipe
You can slice your cabbage any way you like. I did thicker slices this time but thinly sliced or even shredded will work nicely too.

The reason I fell in love with this bright purple pickle is that like shoor (pictured below) it’s rich in probiotics which are said to be good for your guts and boost the immune system. When I was growing up we didn’t know anything about probiotics and their significant role in a healthy diet but we had a bowl of shoor on the table with most meals just because we all loved the pleasantly sour, salty, garlicky, spicy and herby flavour of the pickles.

red-cabbage-shoor-recipe
Iranian fermented mixed vegetable pickle is called shoor.

The Iranian fermented mixed vegetable pickle (shoor) is made with a variety of vegetables including Jerusalem artichokes, cauliflowers, carrots, celery, tiny cucumbers, cabbages, garlic, peppers and chillies as well as some aromatic herbs such as dill, coriander and tarragon. The method of preparation of shoor – which simply means salty – is quite similar to the method used in making other Middle Eastern and Eastern European brined vegetable pickles.

shoor-pickles
Iranian shoor is made with a variety of vegetables.

Shoor is a perfect addition to salads and sandwiches and as an accompaniment to Persian dishes like grilled meats and poultry (kababs/kebabs). I also love to snack on the crunchy vegetables or even roll them in a piece of flatbread for a quick bite. Too much of this yummy pickle, however, raises the salt intake so I try to eat it in moderation.

My red cabbage pickle looks quite identical to the red cabbage pickle from the supermarket which here in the UK always has a lot of sugar. Mine has no sugar and very little vinegar. Apart from the flavour, the big difference is that my pickle will ferment naturally. Higher levels of vinegar like in shopbought pickles prevents fermentation from taking place so there’s no probiotic goodness in them.

This recipe is as simple as it can get. All you need for making delicious fermented red cabbage pickle is a few cloves of garlic, fresh or dried chillies or even dried chilli flakes, salt, a little vinegar and some patience to wait until the pickle is ready to eat!

Ingredients:

  • 1 small head of red cabbage, chopped or shredded
  • A few cloves of garlic, thinly sliced (as many as you like)
  • A few fresh or dried red chillies (as many as you like)

For the brine:

  • 2 litres of water
  • 7 tbsp salt (crushed sea salt is best)
  • 125ml white wine vinegar

Method: 

  1. Mix chopped cabbage and sliced garlic and pack tightly in clean, sterilised jars. Add as many fresh or dried red chillies between layers of chopped cabbage as you like.
  2. Put all the ingredients for the brine in a non-reactive saucepan and bring to the boil. Allow to cool for about three minutes.
  3. Fill the jars with the hot brine mix but leave about 2 centimetres from the top empty. Screw the lids on immediately but not too tightly. Probiotics will begin to grow in the jar and there may be some frothing and leaking. You’ll never know how they will behave because they are live organisms after all. Put the jars on a tray (in case they leak during fermentation) and leave at room temperature to ferment. In warmer weather, your pickle will be ready to eat in two weeks but in colder temperatures, it may take as long as a month so keep an eye on them and tighten the lids once fermentation is over. Enjoy!

Persian-Inspired Sautéed Swiss Chard with Pomegranate

A delicious Persian dish from northern Iran inspired me to write this sautéed Swiss chard and pomegranate recipe. The original dish (esfenaj ba robbe anar) is cooked with spinach but Swiss chard works perfectly in it. Making this dish is a good way to use up all those beautiful chard leaves and add lots of nutrition to your winter diet.

Swiss chard is related to beets and is a very delightful plant to grow in the vegetable garden. The pretty stalks come in a riot of bright reds, pinks and yellows. Very often people use the pretty stalks and bin or compost the leaves but the leaves are so full of nutrition it’s a shame to throw them away.

swiss-chard-and-beets
Swiss chard is from beet family. These beauties came from my allotment last year. The ones on the right with red stalks are chard.

I use chard leaves in Persian soups like my Persian Plum Soup with Fried Mint Topping. Chard leaves are also perfect for stuffing, in the same way as grape vine leaves are. My vegan Persian-Style Stuffed Chard Leaves were a hit with my family. Same goes with beet leaves. Bunches of beet leaves are sold in farmers markets in Iran along with other green for making soups and other dishes.

I grow chard in the vegetable patch, in flower borders among flowering plants and even in pots. It’s so easy to grow from seed and not demanding at all. All you need to do is to push a few seeds in the soil and wait for them to germinate. You can cut larger stalks and the plants will keep producing more right through autumn and early winter months.

swiss-chard
Swiss chard is a biennial plant that can easily be grown from seed between June and October.

My recipe also calls for pomegranate seeds (arils) and molasses. It’s no wonder that pomegranates feature in so many everyday Persian dishes. Pomegranate trees can be found in most places in Iran but they also grow wild in the northern regions of the country. Wild pomegranates are usually very sour and have smaller arils.

Swiss-chard-recipe-vegan

Sour pomegranates are perfect for making pomegranate paste, a very thick dark concentration of pomegranate juice, and pomegranate molasses which is often sweetened with sugar. Only a few years ago it was quite hard to find pomegranate molasses outside Iran and the Middle East anywhere other than in specialty groceries but it has found its way to most supermarkets now, at least here in Britain, and is supplied by many online retailers.

wild-pomegranate
Wild pomegranate is usually small and very tart in flavour.

 

I guess it’s time to give you the recipe. I like to serve this pretty little dish as a side with meat or chicken or as a vegetarian/vegan dish with flat bread or a crusty loaf. The following quantities make generous side portions for four people.

Ingredients:

  • 1 large red onion, thinly sliced
  • 4 tbsp oil (I prefer extra virgin rapeseed oil)
  • 3 cloves of garlic, finely chopped
  • 1 kilo chard stems and leaves
  • 1/2 tsp turmeric
  • 1/4 tsp ground black pepper
  • 1/4 tsp chilli powder (optional)
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1 cup pomegranate seeds (arils)
  • 2 tbsp pomegranate molasses

Instructions:

  1. Roughly chop the chard stems and leaves separately. Set aside.
  2. Heat the oil in a large lidded frying pan and cook the sliced onions on medium-low heat until they are golden. Add the chopped garlic, the spices and chard stems and cook for 2-3 minutes. Throw in the chopped leaves, salt and a few tablespoons of water and cover the pan with the lid. Reduce the heat to low and allow the chard leaves to wilt and cook for about ten minutes.
  3. Save a couple of tablespoons of the pomegranate seeds and add the rest to the chard. Cook while stirring for a few minutes until all the water is completely absorbed. Add the pomegranate molasses and stir. Cover and cook on very low heat for five minutes. Sprinkle with the reserved pomegranate seeds and serve.

Aubergines Stuffed with Walnut & Pomegranate (Bademjan Kabab)

This stuffed aubergine (eggplant) recipe is quite unusual but really really tasty in my opinion. Just think of the earthy flavour of walnuts and the tangy sweetness of pomegranate syrup (molasses). Doesn’t that sound mouthwatering?

Every Iranian cook has a few stuffed aubergine recipes in their repertoire but most recipes call for meat in some form, in small cubes as in my mother’s recipe or ground as in many others’. The meat (lamb or beef) used for stuffing aubergines is usually mixed with parboiled rice, yellow lentils and herbs. Stuffed aubergines are usually cooked in a sauce flavoured with tomato paste or fresh tomatoes.

Persian-stuffed-aubergine
Dolmeh bademjan is a very popular dish and has many variations. This one is stuffed with ground meat, rice and herbs. It’s been cooked in tomato sauce.

The northern Iranian bademjan kabab, however, is completely vegan. I fell in love with it the first time I had it and often make it as a starter for my vegetarian/vegan friends, but not only them as most others seem to enjoy it a lot too. I love the tang of the pomegranate molasses (syrup) and the earthiness of the walnuts. A little cinnamon that the recipe calls for makes it just the perfect flavour combination for me.

Pomegranates grow wild all over the northern regions of Iran. The seeds of wild pomegranates are usually small and the flavour is quite sour. Pomegranate molasses, a very thick reduction of pomegranate juice, is usually made from wild pomegranates. Sugar may only be added if a sweet and sour flavour is desired.

wild-pomegranates
Pomegranate syrup is made by reducing the juice of wild pomegranates. Northern Iranians like it sour and make it very thick but in other areas sugar is sometimes added for a sweet-sour flavour.

bademjan kabab is traditionally served with plain rice, pickled vegetables (torshi) and sliced or grated large radishes similar to mooli. In the traditional method the aubergines are fried in oil before they are stuffed. In the interest of health I prefer to bake them in the oven. Both methods work nicely. It’s best to use longish aubergines. Asian groceries usually have beautiful long ones that are perfect for this dish.

preparing-aubergines-for-stuffing
Bake aubergines in the oven until the flesh is really soft.

Different brands of pomegranate molasses vary in tartness and thickness so it’s a good idea to taste the filling and adjust the sweet-sour balance to your liking with a pinch of sugar if you are prefer a slightly sweet and sour flavour.

For a meaty stuffed aubergine recipe check out my yummy Stuffed Aubergines with Garlicky Beef Mince recipe.

Ingredients

  • 4 medium aubergines
  • 2 tbsp extra virgin rapeseed oil
  • 1 large onion, chopped
  • 100g ground walnuts
  • 1 tsp sea salt
  • 1 tsp turmeric
  • ½ tsp cinnamon
  • ½ tsp black pepper
  • 5 tbsp pomegranate molasses (or to taste depending on the thickness of the molasses)
  • 50g butter (use 3 tbsp oil for vegan)
  • 150ml boiling water
  • A handful of pomegranate seeds to garnish

 

Method:

  1. Preheat the oven to 400F (200C) and line a baking sheet with aluminium foil.
  2. Make a 3 cm deep incision lengthways in each aubergine to allow opening a pocket for filling when they are baked. Rub the aubergines with the oil. Cover very loosely with foil. Bake for half an hour or until the aubergines are really soft. This may take longer or shorter depending on the size of your aubergines so keep an eye on them.
  3. Melt 20 grams of the butter and sauté the onion until lightly golden. Add the spices and cook for one minute, then add the ground walnuts and the pomegranate molasses. Adjust the seasoning and use a pinch of sugar if the filling is too tart.
  4. Gently pull the sides of the cut in each aubergine apart to create a pocket for the filling two thirds of the way down. Fill each aubergine with one fifth of the walnut mixture.
  5. Melt the rest of the butter in the same frying pan and arrange the aubergines in it. Mix the rest of the filling mixture with the water and pour over the aubergines. Cover with the lid and cook on low heat for 30 minutes or until the aubergines are a little browned on the bottom and the oil has separated from the sauce. Gently transfer the aubergines with two large spatulas onto a serving dish. Pour the sauce over, garnish with the reserved pomegranate seeds and serve. Enjoy!